Friday, February 26, 2010

Canine Papilloma Virus

When ever dogs play with each other (dog parks, day care, play dates ect) there is always the risk of transmission of disease. Just like kids playing at school, they can pass things like colds and flu... With dogs we concern ourselves with other things.

Primarily:

Internal Parasites (worms)

External Parasites (fleas)

Viruses


Here at Tails-A-Wagging we counter balance the risk of disease by having an extreme cleaning regimen, as well as a physical environment that limits the ability to spread disease (rubber floor/walls) Everything the dogs come in contact with is cleaned every day. The floors, the playroom walls, the yard, toys, toothbrushes, beds ect. We also require all dogs who attend day care to be current on DHPP, Bordetella and Rabies, and show proof of a negative fecal test every 6 months.

We will spend some time over the next month talking about certain canine disease and concerns, but for today lets talk about CPV.

Canine Papilloma Virus is a viral wart that can be transmitted from one dog to another with normal play.

Certain viruses are able to cause the growth of small round skin tumors commonly referred to as warts. It is important to realize that viral warts are a specific condition and that a growth on the dog’s skin may or may not represent a viral wart.
Human warts are round, somewhat flat, and relatively smooth. Viral warts in dogs tend to possess frond-like structures creating more of a sea anemone or cauliflower-like appearance, though they can be smooth as well. The classical canine viral wart patient is a young dog with warts in or around the mouth or eyes. In such cases where warts have a classic appearance in a classic patient, diagnosis may be obvious but in older patients with warts in locations other than the face, other types of growths become more likely. Because growths can appear harmless but behave malignantly, removal and biopsy are often recommended.

Viral papillomas are round but often have a rough, almost jagged surface reminiscent of a sea anemone or a cauliflower. They occur usually on the lips and muzzle of a young dog (usually less than 2 years of age). Less commonly, papillomas can occur on the eyelids and even the surface of the eye or between the toes. Usually they occur in groups rather than as solitary growths.

HOW IS THIS VIRUS TRANSMITTED?
The infection is transmitted via direct contact with the papillomas on an infected dog or with the virus in the pet’s environment. The incubation period is 2-3 months. This virus can only be spread among dogs. It is not contagious to other pets or to humans. To become infected, the dog generally needs an immature immune system, thus this infection is primarily one of young dogs and puppies. Beyond this, transmission details are sketchy. It is not known whether the infected dog must actually show visible lesions to be contagious, nor how long after regression of lesions contagion is still of concern.

ARE VIRAL PAPILLOMAS DANGEROUS?
Not really. They should go away on their own as the dog’s immune system matures and generates a response against the papillomavirus. There have been two cases published where viral papillomas progressed to malignancy but this is extremely rare and by no means the usual course of the infection. Typically, it takes 1-5 months for papillomas to regress with oral growths tending to regress sooner than those around the eyes.

TREATMENT
In most cases, treatment is unnecessary; one simply allows the papillomas to go away on their own. Tumors can be surgically removed or frozen off cryogenically. Sometimes crushing several growths seems to stimulate the host’s immune system to assist in the tumor regression process. Some veterinarians have also showed using the antibiotic Azithromycin effective.
Boosting your dogs’ immune system is also the best chance of the warts going away. Antioxidant supplements and added Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids are a good addition to your dogs diet.

Since the papillomas is considered contagious to other dogs, if we find a lesion we suspect might be canine papilloma virus your dog will be removed from the play group and sent home. Your veterinarian needs to determine if it is indeed CPV. If you dog is diagnosed with CPV you cannot bring your dog to day care, and you need to let us know to cancel your dogs scheduled days. Your dog needs to be lesion free for 10 days in order to return to day care.


58 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. It is not the poor puppy's fault!

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  2. my dog is currently infected with this and she recieved it from another dog or at a kennel she was staying at. Beileve me 700 dollars to find out what it was plus medication! It runs its course and normally gets worse before it gets better. Our dog just turned 1 and its been 3 months since she was diagnosed with it. We are looking at mid july before it should go away. Is sad to know people dont respect other dog owners and still insist on taking there dog places when they know its infected with something

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    1. I agree - My puppy just got this from playing at a dog park. So frustrating that these people exposed my dog to this. It is very sad that my 7 month old puppy will now miss out on her socialization and play time for possibly months because someone was irresponsible.

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    2. WHAT THE HECK! My puppy just got it from my friend's dog and she knew it was contagious! I'm livid. My poor pup (mini aussie! so cute!) has a freaking gross cauliflower in his mouth:( He only has one, does anyone know if it will come back? or get more?

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    3. Why did you pay $700 to find out it's just warts? My boxer had it when he was around 8 months old, it took one vet visit ($40) and a $7 bottle of Thuja homeopathic remedy to get rid of it. His vet wasn't a holistic vet, just a regular vet. Don't be so quick to judge others for letting their infected dogs go to public dog places...I guarantee most don't even know what they are or that they are contagious. And those that do know what they are, know they are not serious and go away on their own.

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    4. "Don't be so quick to judge others for letting their infected dogs go to public dog places..."

      Are you serious?!?! If your dog has a CONTAGIOUS virus, and you knowingly take it to public dog places and let it play with other dogs, you are an inconsiderate A**hole who deserves to be kicked in the face.

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    5. How about you calm down and actually read the entire statement. They said " don't be so quick to judge others for letting their infected dog go into public dog places....i guarantee most don't even know what they are or that they are contagious." First thing you did was assume everyone is aware of every single illness their dog contracts the minute they get it. Untrue. Unless you are anal retentive and constantly checking your dog for signs, its pretty much impossible to notice an illness exactly when the animal gets it. Plus, this is a completely harmless thing. Its like a child coming home with a cold. Its not the end of the world and the parents aren't "inconsiderate assholes who deserve to be kicked in the face." Shit happens. Get over it.

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  3. Hello well i ear about the papilloma in human but never in in dog and also i would like to ask and important question this terrible disease can infect people ?
    im pretty sure that no one will have sex with a dog well a normal person don't but what about the dogs blood if it some how it will be in touch with a human can get a problem with humans ?

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    1. Canine Papilloma Virus cannot be passed to humans.

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  4. I have a chihuahua/dachshund mix who just had this. I found a little wart like the one on the picture under her lip like 4 weeks ago and since many blogs said that dogs usually get it when they're under 2 years old and because of a weak or underdeveloped immune system, I just went to a local holistic pet store and I asked for an 'immune booster'. He recommended Colostrum. I bought the Symbiotics Colostrum Plus Powder. Apparently even humans can take it. It is known as 'first milk'. a form of milk produced by the mother's mammary glands right after giving birth. It is really concentrated and you only need 2/3 teaspoon per day. I gave it to my puppy, who is only 7 months, in her food for 3 weeks and the wart is already gone. I also kept her away from the dog park and only walked her without allowing her to have contact with other dogs for these 3 weeks and she is all better. =)

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  5. I have an over the counter cure that works. Famotidine (aka Pepcid) really works. My sons dog had multiple warts in his mouth,after trying all the veterinary treatments, he asked me and I told him to try this. Within two weeks all the warts were gone. About a month later one of my dogs had one and within 10 days the wart was gone and his mouth was healed. I gave the dogs one pill two times a day. These are big dogs (50+ pounds). It really worked and it is really cheap, you can buy the generic anywhere.

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  6. I have tried Azithromycin as well as famotadine. The warts are getting bigger. My dog has 4 of them, 2 of which are quite large, the largest being inside her mouth. I first noticed them on July 24. They're worse, not better. I hate to pay the big bucks to have them removed (she will need general anesthesia b/c they are in her mouth), but they're so disgusting and I wonder if they are bothering her.

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  7. Colostrum will probably not do anything for your dog I'm sad to say; the GI tract will only absorb the IGE, the main beneficial aspect of colostrum, shortly after parturition (whelping). Thats why its so important for puppies to nurse right away, so their gi tract will take up some of the immunity. But hey, thats just what i've learned maybe through school.

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  8. My dog was just diagnosed with this on her paw...is there any over the counter suggestions for the Paw area? Its painful for her to walk, and thats sad.

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    1. My GS (age 6+) has suddenly developed these in her paw. the vet gave us animax (a cream). i then bought kids' socks and put it over her paw and secured with a small velcro wrap. it seemed to work for a bit, but now it seems to be getting worse. i also tried Bannix (used for rain rot in horses' hooves), that actually seemed to do a better job. i may go back to that and if that doesn't work, i'm going to find a different vet.

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  9. What do these look like as they are going away? Do they shrink or do they fall off or something? My rott mix has one single wart on his lip. We noticed it about 6 weeks ago as a little blister looking thing and it has progressed into a bigger wart with a cracked appearance and changed from pink to greyish and now seems to be drying out or something. It doesn't bother him, it is so darn nasty looking. It looks like he has a coco puff cereal piece stuck to his lip.

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  10. my 11mth shephard mix has one on his upper, outer lip. It is tiny, but is growing. The vet said it would go away, but could take over a month. the lack of dog play is tough on him. I am going to try some of the immune boosters suggested. but i would like to know, do they get bigger before they die or is this a sign it is getting worse? Is a month realistic? It sounds like a month is minimum.

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  11. Most of the info in the original post comes from the website for Marvista Vet clinic. Credit should have been attributed to them. Could be a copyright infraction.

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  12. My 2 yr old Golden/Dane mix just got what appeared to be a wart remove from hind paw. It was quite large growing in between the pads. Couldn't see it and not sure how long it had been growing. Keeping my fingers crossed it is nothing else. He has been on a host of Vit's since 4 months old (Multi, adrenotrophic, licorce, vit C, white sardine oill-for omega's)when I got him, eats no grain, combo of vegetables raw and cooked plus supplemented wellness kibble and the vet just added Lysine and liquid Vit A & D. Still can not believe he got this....

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  13. HELP!!!
    We got our great dane a little over two months ago (Feb 24) and immediately he began receiving small warts around his mouth. Two months later they are all over his face and they look like islands of warts under his chin. They are around his eyes as well as on his eye lids. He also drools like crazy and they are now starting to bother him as he wipes his face with his paw often. He also bites his lip. There is no sign that he is getting better. A couple of weeks ago we bought "Dog wart Help" which are basically pills to boost his immune system...they haven't improved. Now they have spread to his ears and paws and a few on his body. They smell horribly. We are also afraid because we haven't socialized him in over a month because they are contagious. How long is this supposed to last and does anyone know if we should see a dermatologist specialist? Our vet said it's the worst case he's seen in a very long time and gave us a card for a specialist? I don't want to waste our money if there's nothing that can be done. Please help!

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    1. Hi Angela my hussky as the same problem , the worse case that anybody have seen over 5 months allreday , we did everything ,could you please let me know what did u do
      thank you
      MIRA_COHEN@YAHOO.COM

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  14. Symbiotics Colostrum Powder - Colostrum Plus Powder - Buy Colostrum Plus Powder 21 oz by Symbiotics on Bulk Discount. Herbs-wholesale carries Wide range of Nutritional Supplement, Vitamin and Mineral with Bulk Discount Offer.

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  15. So, we just went through this with our puppy. He is 11 months old and goes to day care, s that's where he got them. We googled a lot of sites and found out what it was but brought him to the vet anyway to be sure and see if there was anything we could do. The vet suggested crushing them at some point and a multivitamin to help boost his immune system. Since he was already 11months he instructed us to get an adult multivitamin. We went a few days after the vet visit and the cluster was getting bigger...and SO GROSS! It looked like a patch of pinkish cauliflower on the inside of his "lip"...so my boyfriend worked up the nerve to start crushing a few. I'd suggest rubber gloves because it can be a little bloody and disgusting. When you crush them right you'll feel some crunching or popping under your fingers-that's how you know you've done it right. He crushed a few of the bigger ones, a couple fell apart right away but for the most part it looked the same just slightly smaller. We decided to wait a bit and see how it went. A day later we could already see some improvement (the warts that were crushed began turning more of a greyish color rather than a healthy pinkish color they had been) and a couple days later I worked up the courage to crush a couple myself. A couple of the ones I did fell off right in my fingers (yuck!) and were a bit bloody. I'd probably say its been about 5 or 6 weeks since we noticed the warts and they are almost gone! Honestly, you would never know he still had them looking at his lip now. They are very tiny and just look like a couple small blemishes. He is contagious until he has them but we will be making an appointment with the vet soon to get a clean bill of health so he can go back to camp. My suggestion is to get a good multivitamin to boost the immune system and crush a few warts in stages and see how it goes. The crushing of the warts didn't seem to bother him unless it was a smaller wart that is close to his actually lip, then it seemed like we were pinching his actual skin and not the wart.

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  16. My dog has had papillomas under his anus for quite some time. It has NOT gone away as they suggested and recently got a cluster on his elbow, which got infected. When looking further, he did have them in his mouth. He is currently on BAYTRIL (a bacterial antibiotic) and low and below all of them are disappearing. Although, I am consulting with the vet to see about getting the elbow cluster removed (whatever remains after his 10 day treatment is complete). I do highly suggest you ask the vet to give you Baytril - if your vet sees no consequence with that drug. Its an antibiotic, so it may just help.

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  17. My 1 1/2 year old pup has just 1 growth just on the outside of her lip. It was the same black color as the pigmentation as her lip when we noticed it. She was seen by her vet who diagnosed it as Canine Papilloma Virus, and prescribed Azithromycin. After just 3 days the growth flattened, then turned pink in color. It is about a week later and still pink.
    We have abstained from play dates and training classes. This is hard for her as she has a ton of energy and loves playing with her friends. I just don't understand how to tell if she is still contagious. Her vet says "2 weeks". That doesn't make full sense to me. I am not finding specific info on any sites I look into. Does ANYONE know ?? Do they just need to flatten or does the pigmentation need to go back to normal, or is it something else that makes them no longer contagious ??

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    1. I found a site for a dog day care that considers a dog contagious for 10 days after the "warts" are gone, before they allow a dog to return to day care. This is their policy, not a medical fact. All the medical sites I found say "it is not known" how long the virus remains in the dog's system. My vet also guessed "two weeks" but admitted to me that it was a guess.

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  18. I work at a dog daycare and many of the dogs have had the papilloma warts. I have started recommending, after hearing success stories from many of the owners, Thuja. It's a natural remedy that can be found at Whole Foods or other big natural food stores. The Thuja extract in liquid form is applied directly to the warts and they go away in less than 2 weeks every time. Good luck!

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  19. MY DOG HAS HAD A PAPILLOMA IN HIS EYE FOR ABOUT 3 MONTHS SEEMS TO B GETTING BIGGER. ITS SO GROSS LOOKING..wHAT CAN I DO TO HELP THIS FALL OFF??? HE WAS AT DAYCARE WHEN HE CAUGHT THIS...

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  20. My vet likened the papilloma virus to fever blisters in humans - that its a virus that has so overpopulated the species that removing all social contact will not help the spread of the virus through the species. She said that some dogs are just prone to being susceptible to it and others aren't - like fever blisters. Any thoughts from any health professionals out there? Now we won't be going to daycare or on big playdates, but cutting off all ties to anywhere other dogs have ever been or ever go seems a bit extreme - that would even take away our potty spot. I'm going to try the homeopathic suggestions on here to see if they will help - my pup has 4 weeks before I have a work trip and he has to go to daycare. here's hoping!

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  21. My dog has had the same problem. 15 month old golden with a white patch on his tongue. My vet said he can still go to the dog park. I will be bringing him to the vet this week just to make sure. I would never bring him and expose others pups. So torn since the vet said I can go.

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  22. My Rott has about 200 of these warts in her mouth! They are white, grey and pink. Some are large and in patches, some are clusters like thick cauliflower. It is grossing me out so much! Why does she have like 200 of them? Does she need surgery? I crushed about 20of them yesterday and some bleeding was present and now my chihuahua has 2 small ones in her mouth. I wonder if her warts will multiply as much as my rotty have. I am also afraid I might catch this. I love my dogs like they are my own children but these warts are driving me crazy to look at. I have even had to take a sedative over looking at them. Please help!

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    Replies
    1. Hello,
      i just read your posting. Its been 5 months for us and they are all over her mouth and smell terribly. She is on meds and nothing is working. What were the signs that your pup was getting better.

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  23. My dog has one right below his eye and one on his upper gum line.. The one on his face is more pink and the one in his mouth is white. Very gross. The vet assured me that these are not contagious for humans, just for other dogs, especially puppies. My lab is about 15 months. I hope they go away soon! They seem to be getting bigger...

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  24. My black lab/Great Dane has a very bad case of CVP. Started with the small warts in her mouth and tongue then spread to her nose and having huge marble size balls hanging off her lips. He tried Arithmizin(sp), then tagament, then Thuja and just recently we had the vet take them off surgical. She looks much better, and I hope the cutting of them off will trigger her system to start fighting this thing. Although it probably won't. We have had it for about 4 weeks. Any other suggestions, I am all ears!

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  25. To the person who works at the doggy daycare or anyone who knows for sure...
    I would like to try the THUJA extract topically by Q-tip. Can you tell us how many times per day it should be applied?
    For a 1.5 year old male Sharpei
    Thanks so much...these things are gross...gag

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  26. Im wondering if elderberry would work, as it is antiviral herb. I would do the colostrum topically as well as internally as much as possible. By squee ezing them they may spread?

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  27. My golden retriever is almost 11 yrs old and has a severe case of CPV. It's all in his mouth and down into his throat. We switched him to soft food so he could eat without throwing up; and to boost his immune system, he is on "Cold FX". We are going onto 5 weeks...and unfortunately I think it's going to take a while to clear up.

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  28. I have reasearched this and see in a lot of sites to use L-Lysine for dogs that have this to boost their immune system. Bottle only costs $4 at grocery store. I started my dog yesterday - fingers crossed.

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  29. My dog had his first one in the corner of his eye. At first I just thought it was eye gook, then it started to grow every two days. It was black, then got a lil bumpy, took him to humaine soc. she hadn't seen cpv in the eye before or a singal wart. Thats all he had though so I kept an eye in it and about 15 days after it arrived it popped and was a bloody mess in his eye. I cleaned the blood and goo out. Later that day one appeared on his lip. I started him on l lysine that day and it hasn't grown at all. He has no other warts. It's been 6 days now and it's starting to turn grey and crack! Let's hope this is the end of these nasty buggers

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  30. My boxer had it when he was 8 months old, vet told us to pick up Thuja at a health store (human health store). I put it in his mouth, closed his mouth and held it for a few seconds, then let him swallow them (they don't really have a taste - holding it there just allows it to absorb a little better). My almost 2 year old Boston has a pimple on her chin, I was freaked thinking it could potentially be an incoming wart and knowing that coconut oil is anti-fungal and anti-viral I have been putting it on her 'pimple' everyday and it's clearing up. Wondering if coconut oil would help warts too because of being anti-viral and fungal? Worth a shot in addition to the Thuja!

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  31. I have a 6 month old German Shepherd, who is currently having this problem. It started with a growth on his belly that was dark and grew incredibly quickly. We took him to a couple vets and no one seemed to know what it was, so we had it removed and a biopsy was performed. Low and behold the result was a canine papilloma, which they said tends to go away on its own. He now has another papilloma, that is dark like the first, on his abdomen again. As well as several in his mouth. I also just found another large one under his tail that the vet missed on at least 2 separate visits. Now the vet is saying I need to has them all cauterized and removed and that there is no other option and that they do not go away on their own. ?! Which is contrary to everything I have read here and on every other site. Does anyone else have an opinion here? Is there a different type of papilloma that I am not aware of, or is it time for me to find a new vet?

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  32. Just to be clear, this is a virus. Antibiotics will not eliminate this as a result. They do usually self resolve, but it is a clear sign the immune system is not optimal and should be boosted.

    L-Lysine, ester - C and Thuja do the trick almost every time for most dogs. All should be resolved within a month.

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  33. My pittie mix has developed the pap from doggy daycare. She has about a nickle sized lump on her paw and the vet said it'll fall off. within a year! Just last week she has devleoped 2 small cauliflower like warts. One in each corner or her lips. She had previously been treated with azryimothin and now our vet just recommends due to het age (8months) to simply let them fall off. She licks the one of her paw and I'm concerned for infection= a sock on the paw, doesn't stay thus doesn't work... suggestions?

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  34. When our vet told us our Dane had CPV and that it was very common for puppies and older dogs with weaker immune systems to contract this virus, AND how common the virus itself is my first thought was, "Why don't vets tell us about this virus during the first wellness visit"? I think if people were more aware of CPV and how playing with other puppies or immune-compromised dogs becomes out of the question for as long as six months, they may consider being a bit more cognizant of marks, bumps, etc. that weren't there before. It has broken our hearts that our puppy has not been able to go to the dog park (her favorite place). I hope people take the time to learn about CPV, the signs, symptoms and just how contagious it is before they socialize their dogs. And I do believe it is quite negligent if you are aware of a mark/spot on your dog and you don't get it checked out.

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  35. I work at a doggie daycare where an inconsiderate 7 mth old Dane owner dropped his dog off to board for 2 weeks while he goes to Jamaica. He put all our dogs at risk. but luckily great employees noticed right away and when he gets back he will find his puppy boarding at his vet. The same vet who told him not to bring his dog to camp to board.

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  36. Pretty sure my 4 yr old Golden Retriever has these. When I noticed initially I thought she has just scraped her chin/lips while chasing a ball, so she went to daycare 2 days ago. She also stinks from her mouth. We're going to the vet this afternoon. I'm pretty sure we over vaccinated her almost 2 months ago, causing an issue with her immune system, so she picked up the virus. Guess, we'll never know exactly how it happened. Hopefully, we get some confirmation and resolution this afternoon.

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  37. My 3 poodles have had these for years. The largest is 1.5 inches wide. My oldest is 17, my youngest is 15. I suspect the virus accompanied 1 of my babies when I adopted her. They do not disappear and if they do... let's put it this way.. then I never noticed them to begin with. Vet wants to perform surgery but I can't afford to get all of them removed. One disappeared after using thuja but then my luck ran out. I have tried everything.. currently, I'm trialling wartsoff by creative science. Long, slow, gross process with blood and pus but the largest on my youngest IS shrinking. I guess I'm lucky because none have showed up in their mouths.

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  38. My dog (16 month old boxer) was just diagnosed with this. It is believed that he got it at either the dog park, or doggie day care. He can't go back to either until his warts are gone, and have been for 10 days. This greatly upsets me, because he LOVES going to both places, and may not be able to go for up to a few months. While I do think it is extremely irresponsible for someone to KNOWINGLY send their contagious dog to these places, putting others at risk, my vet also said that a dog can contract this, be contagious WITHOUT having an outbreak for several weeks, or even months. So it IS possible that whichever dog gave this to your dog, the dog "parents" may not have even known that they had it if there was no outbreak. Unfortunately even my dog could have given it to others, because until he had his outbreak, we didn't know he had it. But once I knew he did have it, I did the responsible thing and called his day care to let them know that 1-He wouldn't be back until he was clear, and 2-Just to keep an eye out in case they notice any on other dogs. That's all I can do.

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  39. We rescued my dog a few months ago, and he had only one wart on his lip. When he was at his vet check-up our vet told us it was a juvenile wart, and it will fall off. We were never told it was CPV, or that we couldn't take him around dogs. So, please don't think everyone is inconsiderate, because some people just didn't know. About a month ago I did research and was shocked to see it was contagious, and stopped taking my dog to the park.

    The one wart on his lip started getting really big, looked like a piece of kibble on his lip! I started to notice he had terrible breath for a 6 month old puppy, sure enough he had the most discussing wart behind one of his canines. Once those two warts started to get bigger, I noticed a few small "canker sores" starting to pop up on his cheeks and gums. Around two weeks ago I ordered Vitamin C and Thuja. So every morning with his food I put in 1/4 tsp of Vitamin C, and 6 drops of Thuja. My dog HATES the taste of Thuja, so rubbing it on his warts or putting the drops in his mouth wasn't an option. I have been doing this same routine every single day for the past two weeks. In addition to that, I have been doing really rough play with my dog (tug of war, a lot of pulling toys, etc.) and fortunately for me the other day part of his big wart started falling off, bled everywhere, and the other half fell off today, along with the one behind his canine. Now, here's the most disgusting part of all, I then fed it to my dog. It will absolutely help their immune system kick into gear and destroy this virus. So if you either pull the wart off, or happen to find it around your house, get it and feed it to your dog who has the CPV. If your dog won't eat it due to blood, or whatever it may be, hide it in a treat...simple as that. I'll update this if I see more warts appear, but I'll continue my dog on the Vitamin C and Thuja for the next week.

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  40. I think my dog has warts growing on his penis. They are all pink and fairly small, but they are at the base and on the shaft. He likes to hump the cat every morning; and this week, I noticed he had bumps that I'd not seen before. I'm really afraid he's going to need an expensive operation, and possibly an amputation. I can't imagine how he got them since he's not around that many dogs. But viruses go wherever they are programmed to go, I guess. I'm kind of horrified. There's not much information about papilloma on dogs' wieners, so I thought I'd just mention it at least. He's had other little bumps on his skin -- one next to his testicles that the doctor put silver nitrate on. It turned black and reduced significantly then. But it didn't look like these: pinkish bumps, but they flop over. It's making really sad. He'll be 10 soon, and seems perfectly healthy otherwise. Maybe I shouldn't let him ever say hi to the other dogs. All he tries to do is sniff and lick them down there anyway, and it grosses me out and I pull him away ASAP. I always thought it would lead to trouble. Will see the vet in a couple of days. Some people are saying their dogs' infection cleared up, others are saying it's getting worse, and some are saying their dogs' papilloma infection never cleared up. That's very distressing. I guess we will get a biopsy.

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    1. My pugalier just had an rapid eruption of 5 warts around around the mouth, two of the warts quite sizeable. I didn't want him to spread them to his brother so I was keen to get them cleared up. Keeping the two dogs apart was not possible.

      I have kept them both away from other dogs, avoided the dog park and so on, to avoid spread to other dogs.

      I didn't worry about asking the vet for biopsy. I understand that diagnosis is by visual inspection, and these were classical 'cauliflower' papillomas.

      Because they are in/around the mouth I didn't want to use any topical medicines such as salicylic or lactic acid, thuja, or even vitamin E. Can dogs get vitamin E toxicity? I don't know and I don't want to find out the hard way. I know that dogs can get toxicity from multiple substances that we consider 'safe' in humans.

      So I did cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen, because I had ready access to it, and that's what I'd want done if I had huge warts on my face. I wouldn't wait 4-5 months for spontaneous remission if it was me with a giant wart on my bottom lip, so why should he.

      I figure that since human children can tolerate cryotherapy without any local anaesthesia, then dogs, who are tougher, should be ok.

      And he does tolerate the N2 quite well, although it is easier with two people, but then again, clipping his nails is a two person job, so it is more his skittish personality than anything else. It clearly doesn't hurt him, and he appears to be amazingly cold tolerant. Whereas humans will burn and blister from liquid nitrogen, he gets basically no 'burn' type reaction at all! It takes multiple freezes to work (the thaw is what kills the cells, not the freeze). It may be that the trauma of freeze/thaw also stimulates the immune system in the same way as the "scratch them to make them bleed" technique. (I'm always doubtful when people talk about 'stimulating the immune system', but that is the common advice and I'm not a vet). The warts need a generous dose of cold, much more than a human wart.

      I've frozen the warts about 5 times the last week and they are almost gone. I'm not surprised that it needs multiple freezes. The real test will be whether they recur.

      Now you probably don't gave liquid nitrogen readily available, and this is not the time to handle it for the first time, if you spill it upon yourself you will be burned, but the vet may, and there are over-the-counter home-use cryotherapy packs sold by the pharmacy in the USA (for human warts of course - but they are FDA licensed for human children > 4yrs so they should be relatively safe). Though if you have never frozen a wart then you may be reluctant to teach yourself - but maybe now is be the time to learn!

      In my opinion, on balance, taking into account speed of resolution versus potential stress/trauma to my dog, cryotherapy is a winner. I haven't tried the over the counter wart cryotherapy kits, but that's what I'd use in preference to using topical medicines that may be ingested by my dog in unknown quantities with uncertain effects.

      If they were huge warts, or if they recur, I would ask the vet to do local anaesthesia, curette or excision of the wart, and cautery, to get the wart gone asap.

      As i said above, they appear to need multiple freezes. Don't expect a one shot kill!

      Delete
  41. Dermatologist in delhi will take care of your skin related related issues. You just need to mention your troubles and get the best services from the our experts.

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  42. Did any take their dog to the vet because their baby couldn't keep food down or in & this is what the vet said? He told me because he has diarrhea and puking.. NO WARTS.. This is what it was & it could be fatal.. Is there a virus like this similar in name that it could be??! Maybe I just heard him wrong?! I hope so!!

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  43. My doggie has this. The vet told me it was due to receiving too many vaccines at once - he had them a month ago. She told me that it is actually not contagious to other dogs or humans and to let it heal on its own. So please don't blame the dog owners. If a human has a cold sore - we don't quarantine them?

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  44. Just found out my 11 month old pup has this. One on the tongue, one on the lip. Like a few others have mentioned, my vet said there is no use keeping my dog away from other dogs (dog park, daycare, etc) because the virus is so common. Think about it this way - If your child had a wart you wouldn't keep him or her from going to school or playing on the playground. Same doggy warts. My advice, stop freaking out people. It will go away soon enough, just like your childhood warts (if you had one).

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  45. Thank you for this advice! Very good information! My dog had COPV and my vet said to leave it alone and it would go away in a few months! I was heart broken. She wasn't allowed at doggy daycare until it was gone and she was missing her friends. I did some research online trying to find a natural way to at least address the issue. There isn't alot of information about this out there but I found these http://nzymespetproducts.com/papilloma/ drops that you use both internally and topically. It only took a week until I started seeing them shrink. It's been 3 weeks and she was back at doggy daycare yesterday! So thankful I found this!

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